Quantum Theory shows that consciousness moves into another universe after Death

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Quantum Theory shows that consciousness moves into another universe after Death
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Adam Rangihana
Adam Rangihana
MSNBC: Free Online Abridgment of Biocentrism
How Life Creates the Universe:
Authors say cosmology misses the big picture unless it includes biology

By Robert Lanza with Bob Berman
Special to msnbc.com

image: www.robertlanzabiocentrism.com/images/books/…

Image of a Head in Doorway
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The 21st century is predicted to be the Century of Biology, a shift from the previous century dominated by physics. It seems fitting, then, to begin the century by turning the universe outside-in and unifying the foundations of science, not with imaginary strings that occupy equally imaginary unseen dimensions, but with a much simpler idea that is rife with so many shocking new perspectives that we are unlikely ever to see reality the same way again.
In the past few decades, major puzzles of mainstream science have forced a re-evaluation of the nature of the universe that goes far beyond anything we could have imagined. A more accurate understanding of the world requires that we consider it biologically centered. It’s a simple but amazing concept that Biocentrism attempts to clarify: Life creates the universe, instead of the other way around. Understanding this more fully yields answers to several long-held puzzles. This new model — combining physics and biology instead of keeping them separate, and putting observers firmly into the equation — is called biocentrism. Its necessity is driven in part by the ongoing attempts to create an overarching view, a theory of everything. Such efforts have now stretched for decades, without much success except as a way of financially facilitating the careers of theoreticians and graduate students.

Could the long-sought Theory of Everything be merely missing a component that was too close for us to have noticed? Some of the thrill that came with the announcement that the human genome had been mapped or the idea that we are close to understanding the “Big Bang” rests in our innate human desire for completeness and totality. But most of these comprehensive theories fail to take into account one crucial factor: We are creating them. It is the biological creature that fashions the stories, that makes the observations, and that gives names to things. And therein lies the great expanse of our oversight, that science has not confronted the one thing that is at once most familiar and most mysterious — consciousness. As Emerson wrote in “Experience,” an essay that confronted the facile positivism of his age: “We have learned that we do not see directly, but mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these subject-lenses have a creative power; perhaps there are no objects.”

Muddy universe
For several centuries, starting roughly with the Renaissance, a single mindset about the construct of the cosmos has dominated scientific thought. This model has brought us untold insights into the nature of the universe, and countless applications that have transformed every aspect of our lives. But this model — failing us now in a myriad of ways — may be reaching the end of its useful life.

The old model proposes that the universe was until rather recently a lifeless collection of particles bouncing against each other, and obeying predetermined rules that were mysterious in their origin. The universe is presented as a watch that somehow wound itself and that, allowing for a degree of quantum randomness, will unwind in a semi-predictable way.

There are many problems with the current paradigm — some obvious, others rarely mentioned but just as fundamental. But the overarching problem involves life, since its initial arising is still a scientifically unknown process, even if the way it then changed forms can be apprehended using Darwinian mechanisms. The bigger problem is that life contains consciousness, which, to say the least, is poorly understood.

Consciousness is not just an issue for biologists; it’s a problem for physics. There is nothing in modern physics that explains how a group of molecules in a brain creates consciousness. The beauty of a sunset, the taste of a delicious meal, these are all mysteries to science — which can sometimes pin down where in the brain the sensations arise, but not how and why there is any subjective personal experience to begin with. And, what’s worse, nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter. Our understanding of this most basic phenomenon is virtually nil. Interestingly, most models of physics do not even recognize this as a problem.

But even putting aside the life-and-consciousness issues, the current model leaves much to be desired when it comes to explaining the fundamentals of our universe. The cosmos sprang out of nothingness 13.7 billion years ago, in a titanic event facetiously labeled the Big Bang. We don’t begin to understand where the big bang came from even if we continually tinker with the details. Indeed, every theorist realizes in his bones that you can never get something from nothing, and that the Big Bang is no explanation at all for the origins of everything, but merely, at best, the partial description of a single event in a continuum that is probably timeless.

It’s one thing to acknowledge that theoretical physicists are brilliant people even if they do tend to drip food on themselves at buffets. But at some point, virtually everyone has thought, or at least felt: This really doesn’t work. This doesn’t explain anything fundamental, not really.

A scientific swamp
Then, too, in the last few decades there has been considerable discussion of a basic paradox in the construction of the universe. Why are the laws of physics exactly balanced for animal life to exist? There are over 200 physical parameters within the solar system and universe so exact that it strains credulity to propose that they are random — even if that is exactly what standard contemporary physics baldly suggests. These fundamental constants of the universe — constants that are not predicted by any theory — all seem to be carefully chosen, often with great precision, to allow for existence of life and consciousness (yes, consciousness raises its annoying head yet another time). We have absolutely no reasonable explanation for this.

When it comes right down to it, today’s science is amazingly good at figuring out how the parts work. What eludes us is the big picture. We provide interim answers, we create exquisite new technologies from our ever-expanding knowledge of physical processes. We do badly in just one area, which unfortunately encompasses all the bottom-line issues: What is the nature of this thing we call reality, the universe as a whole?

Any honest metaphorical summary of the current state of explaining the cosmos as a whole is: a swamp. And this particular Everglade is one where the alligators of common sense must be evaded at every turn.

Some scientists insist that a Theory of Everything is just around the corner, and then we’ll essentially know it all. Any day now. It hasn’t happened, and it may not happen until we better understand a critical component of the cosmos — a component that has been shunted it out of the way because science doesn’t know what to do with it. This, consciousness, is not a small item. It is not like anything else. Indeed, it is nothing like anything else. Consciousness is awareness, or perception, which in an utter mystery has somehow arisen from molecules and goo. How did inert, random bits of carbon ever morph into that Japanese guy who always wins the hot dog eating contest?

In short, the attempt to explain the nature of the universe, its origins, its parameters, and what is really going on, requires an understanding of how the observer — our presence — plays a role. At first this may seem impossibly difficult, since much of awareness or consciousness and certainly its origins are still mysterious. But as we shall see, we can use what we know, and what we are increasingly discovering, to formulate models of the cosmos that make sense of things for the first time.

The disappearing kitchen
Undeniably it is the biological creature that makes the observations and creates the theories. Our entire education system in all disciplines, the construction of our language, revolve around a bottom-line mindset that assumes a separate universe “out there” into which we have each individually arrived on a very temporary basis. It is further assumed that we accurately perceive this external pre-existing reality and play little or no role in its appearance.

However, starting in the 1920s, the results of experiments have shown just the opposite. The observer critically influences the outcome. An electron turns out to be both a particle and a wave but how and, more importantly, where such a particle will be located remains dependent upon the very act of observation. This is perhaps most vivid in the famous two-hole experiment, which has been performed so many times, with so many variations, it’s conclusively proven that if one “watches” a subatomic particle or a bit of light pass through slits on a barrier, it behaves like a particle and creates solid-looking hits behind the individual slits on the final barrier that measures the impacts. Like a tiny bullet, it logically passes through one or the other hole. But if the scientists do not observe the trajectory of the particle, then it exhibits the behavior of waves that allow it pass through both holes at the same time.

Since then, the list of paradoxes and intractable problems has continued to grow, starting with those accompanying the Big Bang (for instance, how could the entire universe — indeed, the laws of nature themselves — pop out of nothingness?) to experiments during the past decade that show separate particles can influence each other instantaneously over great distances — as if they’re endowed with a kind of ESP. It works with light, too: When born-together pairs of photons are created in a special kind of crystal, observing one member instantly influences the behavior the other — even if they are separated by enormous distances. They are intimately linked in a manner suggesting there’s no space between them, and no time influencing their behavior.

These and similar experiments have befuddled scientists for decades. Some of the greatest physicists have described them as impossible to intuit. How can quantum physics be so impervious to metaphor, visualization, and language? Amazingly, if we accept a life-created reality at face value, it all becomes simple and straightforward to understand.

Take the seemingly undeniable logic that your kitchen is always present, its contents assuming all their familiar shapes and colors whether or not you are in it. But consider: The shapes, colors, and forms known as your kitchen are seen as they are solely because photons of light from the overhead bulb bounce off the various objects and then interact with your brain through a complex set of retinal and neural intermediaries. But on its own, light doesn’t have any color, nor any brightness, nor any visual characteristics at all. It’s merely an electrical and magnetic phenomenon. So while you may think that the kitchen as you remember it was “there” in your absence, the unquestionable reality is that nothing remotely resembling what you can imagine could be present when a consciousness is not interacting.

Quantum physics comes to a similar conclusion. At night you click off the lights and leave for the bedroom. Of course the kitchen is there, unseen, all through the night. Right? But, in fact, the refrigerator, stove and everything else are composed of a shimmering swarm of matter/energy. The results of quantum physics, such as the two-slit experiment, tell us that not a single one of those subatomic particles actually occupies a definite place. Rather, they exist as a range of possibilities — as waves of probability — as the German physicist Max Born demonstrated back in 1926. They are statistical predictions — nothing but a likely outcome. In fact, outside of that idea, nothing is there! If they are not being observed, they cannot be thought of as having any real existence — either duration or a position in space. It is only in the presence of an observer — that is, when you go back in to get a drink of water — that the mind sets the scaffolding of these particles in place. Until it actually lays down the threads (somewhere in the haze of probabilities that represent the object’s range of possible values) they cannot be thought of as being either here or there, or having an actual position, a physical reality.

Indeed, it is here that biocentrism suggests a very different view of reality. Most people, in and out of the sciences, imagine the external world to exist on its own, with an appearance that more-or-less resembles what we ourselves see. Human or animal eyes, according to this view, are merely clear windows that accurately let in the world. If our personal window ceases to exist, as in death, or is painted black and opaque, as in blindness, that doesn’t in any way alter the continued existence of the external reality or its supposed “actual” appearance. A tree is still there, the moon still shines, whether or not we are cognizing them. They have an independent existence. True, a dog may see an autumn maple solely in shades of gray, and an eagle may perceive much greater detail among its leaves, but most creatures basically apprehend the same visually real object, which persists even if no eyes were upon it.

This “Is it really there?” issue is ancient, and of course predates biocentrism. Biocentrism, however, explains why one view and not the other may be correct. The converse is equally true: Once one fully understands that there is no independent external universe outside of biological existence, the rest more or less falls into place.

Read more at www.robertlanzabiocentrism.com/biocentrism-how-life-creates-the-universe/
7 years ago
Adam Rangihana
Adam Rangihana
Robert Lanza, MD - BIOCENTRISM

‘Biocentrism’: How Life Creates the Universe
“The Universe in Your Head: Stem cell pioneer Robert Lanza generates controversy on a whole different plane with “Biocentrism,” a book that lays out his theory of everything.” Read the article here.

MSNBC.com featured Dr. Robert Lanza’s book (co-authored with leading astronomer Bob Berman) Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe on its National Academies award-winning site “Cosmic Log.” The article by Science Editor Alan Boyle includes an exclusive online abridgment of the book based on Lanza’s essay A New Theory of the Universe which appeared in The American Scholar, a leading intellectual journal which has previously published works by Albert Einstein, Margaret Mead, and Carl Sagan, among others. According to Nielsen Online, msnbc.com is the number one Current Events and Global News site with more than 40 million unique visitors a month.

“Biomedical researcher Robert Lanza has been on the frontier of cloning and stem cell studies for more than a decade, so he’s well-acclimated to controversy,” writes Alan Boyle, MSNBC.com’s Science Editor. “But his book ‘Biocentrism’ is generating controversy on a different plane by arguing that our consciousness plays a central role in creating the cosmos. ‘By treating space and time as physical things, science picks a completely wrong starting point for understanding the world,’ Lanza declares. Any claim that space and time aren’t cold, hard, physical things has to raise an eyebrow…. Other physicists point out that Lanza’s view is fully in line with the perspective from quantum mechanics that the observer plays a huge role in how reality is observed. ‘So what Lanza says in this book is not new,’ Richard Conn Henry, a physics and astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, said in a book review. ‘Then why does Robert have to say it at all? It is because we, the physicists, do not say it – or if we do say it, we only whisper it, and in private – furiously blushing as we mouth the words. True, yes; politically correct, hell no!’ … Does all this make a difference in daily life, or how you see the world? Take a look at the free sample of ‘Biocentrism.’”

Link to exclusive online abridgement “‘Biocentrism’ How life creates the universe: Authors say cosmology misses the big picture unless it includes biology: Click here
7 years ago
Adam Rangihana
Adam Rangihana
Who is Robert Lanza
Robert Lanza, M. D. is currently Head of Astellas Global Regenerative Medicine, and is Chief Scientific Officer at Ocata Therapeutics (formerly Advanced Cell Technology) and Adjunct Professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. His current research focuses on stem cells and regenerative medicine and their potential to provide therapies for some of the world’s most deadly and debilitating conditions.

Dr. Lanza has hundreds of publications and inventions, and over 30 scientific books, including “Principles of Tissue Engineering” and “Essentials of Stem Cell Biology,” which are considered the definitive references in the field. He received his BA and MD degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was both a University Scholar and Benjamin Franklin Scholar. He was also a Fulbright Scholar, and was part of the team that cloned the world’s first human embryo, as well as the first to successfully generate stem cells from adults using somatic-cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning).

Lanza’s work has been crucial to our understanding nuclear transfer and stem cell biology. In 2001 he was also the first to clone an endangered species (a Gaur), and in 2003, he cloned an endangered wild ox (a Banteng) from the frozen skin cells of an animal that had died at the San Diego Zoo nearly a quarter-of-a-century earlier. Lanza and his colleagues were also the first to demonstrate that nuclear transplantation could be used to reverse the aging process and to generate immune-compatible tissues, including the first organ tissue-engineered from cloned cells. One of his early achievements came from his demonstration that techniques used in preimplantation genetic diagnosis could be used to generate human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) without embryonic destruction.

He and colleagues have also succeeded in differentiating human pluripotent stem cells into retinal (RPE) cells, and has shown that they provide long-term benefit in animal models of vision loss. Using this technology some forms of blindness may be treatable, including macular degeneration and Stargardt disease, a currently untreatable form eye disease that causes blindness in teenagers and young adults. Lanza’s company just completed two clinical trials in the United States using them to treat degenerative eye diseases. ACT carried out the only pluripotent stem cell trial in Europe.

In October 2014, Dr. Lanza and his colleagues published a paper in the journal The Lancet, providing the first evidence of the long-term safety and possible biologic activity of pluripotent stem cell progeny into humans with any disease. “For a nice two decades scientists have dreamt about using human embryonic stem cells to treat diseases,” said Gautam Naik, Science Reporter at the Wall Street Journal “that day has finally come…scientists have used human embryonic stem cells to successfully treat patients suffering from severe vision loss.” RPE cells derived from embryonic stem cells were injected into the eyes of 18 patients with either Stargardt’s disease or dry-AMD. The patients were followed for more than three years, and half of them were able to read three more lines on the eye chart, which translated to critical improvements in their daily lives as well.

Lanza and his colleagues in South Korea also recently published the first report of the safety and potential efficacy of pluripotent stem cells in Asian patients. hESC-derived RPE were transplanted in four Asian patients: two with dry age-related macular degeneration and two with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy. There were no safety issues related to the transplanted cells. Visual acuity improved 9-19 letters in three patients, and remained stable (+1 letter) in one patient. The results confirm that hESC-derived cells could serve as a potentially safe new source of tissue for regenerative medicine.

Lanza has been a major player in the scientific revolution that has led to the documentation that nuclear transfer and reprogramming factors can restore developmental potential in a differentiated cell. One of his successes was showing that it is feasible to generate functional oxygen-carrying red blood cells from human pluripotent stem cells. The blood cells were comparable to normal transfusable blood and could serve as a potentially inexhaustible source of “universal” blood. His team also discovered how to generate functional hemangioblasts — a population of “ambulance” cells — from hESCs. In animals, these cells quickly repaired vascular damage, cutting the death rate after a heart attack in half and restoring the blood flow to ischemic limbs that might otherwise have to be amputated. He has recently published similar pre-clinical work showing hESC-derived cells can be used to treat a range of other diseases, including multiple sclerosis and lupus, among others.

In 2009, Lanza and a team lead by Kwang-Soo Kim at Harvard University reported a safe method for generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Human iPS cells were created from skin cells by direct delivery of proteins, thus eliminating the harmful risks associated with genetic manipulation. This new method provides a potentially safe and non-controversial source of patient-specific stem cells for translation into the clinic. The Editors of the Nature selected Lanza and Kim’s paper on protein reprogramming as one of five “Research Highlights” of the year. Discover magazine stated, “Lanza’s single-minded quest to usher in this new age has paid dividends in scientific insights and groundbreaking discoveries.”

Dr. Lanza has received numerous awards, including TIME Magazine’s 2014 TIME 100 list of the “100 Most Influential People in the World,” the Top 50 “World Thinkers” (2015), the 2013 Il Leone di San Marco award in Medicine; an NIH Director’s Award (2010) for “Translating Basic Science Discoveries into New and Better Treatments”; the 2013 “TOP 50 Global Stem Cell Influencers” (voted Top 4 “Most Influential People on Stem Cells” along with James Thomson and Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka); the 2010 “Movers and Shakers” Who Will Shape Biotech Over the Next 20 Years (BioWorld, along with Craig Venter and President Barack Obama); the 2007 100 Most Inspiring People in the Life-Sciences Industry (PharmaVOICE, “For his discoveries ‘behind the medicines making a significant impact on the pipelines of today and of the future’”; the 2007 Outstanding Contribution in Contemporary Biology Award (Brown University, “For his groundbreaking research and contributions in stem cell science and biology”; the 2006 All-Star Award for Biotechnology (MA High Tech, for “pushing stem cells’ future”); the 2005 Rave Award for Medicine (Wired magazine, “For eye-opening work on embryonic stem cells”); Massachusetts Medical Society award; and The Boston Globe’s William O. Taylor award, among others.

Dr. Lanza and his research have been featured in almost every media outlet in the world, including CNN, TIME, Newsweek, People, as well as the front pages of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, among others. Lanza studied with some of the greatest thinkers of our time, including Nobel laureates Gerald Edelman and Rodney Porter, renowned Harvard psychologist B.F. Skinner (the “Father of modern behaviorism”), Jonas Salk (discoverer of the Polio vaccine), and heart transplant pioneer Christiaan Barnard.

In 2007, Lanza published a feature article, “A New Theory of the Universe” in The American Scholar, a leading intellectual journal which has previously published works by Albert Einstein, Margaret Mead, and Carl Sagan, among others. His theory places biology above the other sciences in an attempt to solve one of nature’s biggest puzzles, the theory of everything that other disciplines have been pursuing for the last century. This new view has become known as Biocentrism. In 2009, he co-authored a book “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe” with leading astronomer Bob Berman. In biocentrism, space and time are forms of animal sense perception, rather than external physical objects. Understanding this more fully yields answers to several major puzzles of mainstream science, and offers a new way of understanding everything from the microworld (for instance, the reason for Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and the double-slit experiment) to the forces, constants, and laws that shape the universe. Nobel laureate E. Donnall Thomas stated “Any short statement does not do justice to such a scholarly work. The work is a scholarly consideration of science and philosophy that brings biology into the central role in unifying the whole.”

“Robert Lanza is the living embodiment of the character played by Matt Damon in the movie “Good Will Hunting.” Growing up underprivileged in Stoughton, Mass., south of Boston, the young preteen caught the attention of Harvard Medical School researchers when he showed up on the university steps having successfully altered the genetics of chickens in his basement. Over the next decade, he was “discovered” and taken under the wing of scientific giants such as psychologist B.F. Skinner, immunologist Jonas Salk, and heart transplant pioneer Christiaan Barnard. His mentors described him as a “genius,” a “renegade thinker,” even likening him to Einstein.” – U.S.News & World Report, cover story

Lanza Named One of TIME Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World

Lanza Named One of TIME Magazines 100 Most Influential People in the World
Dr. Robert Lanza selected for the 2014 TIME 100 list of the hundred most influential people in the world, along with Pope Francis, Robert Redford, and other artists, pioneers, leaders, titans and icons.

Lanza Featured in Fortune Magazine
“…he’s the standard-bearer for stem cell research”

“Lanza published a paper in The Lancet earlier this year detailing the results of early clinical trials involving two women suffering from macular degeneration. A UCLA ophthalmologist
Lanza Featured in Fortune Magazine
injected each woman with 50,000 retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, and according to the paper, both claim to have better vision as a result. They’re not 20/20. But after a single injection one now walks the mall alone, uses her computer, and can pour a cup of coffee. The other sees colors and can read five letters on the eye chart. If Lanza is remembered one day as the man who saved millions from blindness, his story will provide a ready-made biopic for Ben Affleck. Born in the hardscrabble town of Roxbury and raised by a professional gambler, he escaped the economic underclass through intelligence and imagination. At 13, he altered the DNA of a chicken to make it change color; the experiment was published in Nature. His sisters never graduated from high school. He received an MD from Penn and a Fulbright scholarship, and has collaborated with giants, including B.F. Skinner and Jonas Salk. He was the first ever to clone an endangered species, and now he’s the standard-bearer for stem cell research.”

Lanza named one of the top 50 "World Thinkers"

Lanza Featured in Fortune Magazine
Dr. Lanza selected as one of Prospect Magazine’s “World Thinkers 2015.” The thinkers were chosen for “engaging in original and profound ways with the central questions of the world today,” as well as for their continuing significance for “this year’s biggest questions” (in economics, science, philosophy, cultural and social criticism and in politics).

Robert Lanza Featured in Financial Times
Lanza Featured in Financial Times Magazine
At Home with Robert Lanza, stem-cell and cloning pioneer
Professionally, Lanza works at the cutting edge of human discovery, but the majority of his domestic space looks like a museum from a bygone era.

Lanza Voted Top 4 “Most Influential People on Stem Cells”

Lanza Featured in Fortune Magazine
Lanza featured in the 2013 “TOP 50 Global Stem Cell Influencers.” It is the result of a global survey of the stem cell community, which yielded thousands of votes. The 50 personalities were picked based on their career achievements whether this was groundbreaking discovery and research, innovation, or lifetime dedication. Lanza was among the top four on the list, alongside James Thomson and Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka.

Lanza Featured in Der Spiegel, Europe’s largest news magazine

Lanza Featured in Spiegel Online International
The Dawning of a New Era of Hope

Stem cell researcher Robert Lanza hopes to save thousands of lives — and for a long time this caused him to fear for his own… At the time, a doctor was threatened at a nearby fertility clinic, and a pipe bomb exploded at a bio lab in Boston. “Back then I thought that there was probably a 50-50 chance that I was going to get knocked off because I was so visible,” says the doctor. “I said, okay, try to kill me — I’m still going to do what I think is right.” In Lanza’s case, doing what is “right” involves working with therapies based on human stem cells. The blind shall see again; the paralyzed shall walk again; the hemophiliac shall not bleed anymore. That may sound like something out of the Bible, but Lanza is no faith healer. In fact, the US business magazine Fortune called him “the standard-bearer for stem cell research.” Lanza is often compared to the main character played by Matt Damon in the film “Good Will Hunting,” a highly talented outsider who, like Lanza, comes from a humble background.

Initial Success: “We have some surprisingly good visual outcome,” says Steven Schwartz, an eye surgeon at UCLA. He says that one of his patients can read a clock again and go shopping, while another can recognize colors again. Lanza is a “genius” and his work is “stellar,” Schwartz says.

Previous News
Dr. Robert Lanza Featured on ABC’s Barbara Walters Special
Robert Lanza on the Barbara Walters Special
Robert Lanza featured on “Live to be 150, Can You Do It?”.

by ABC News

DISCOVER Interview: Robert Lanza
Photo of Robert Lanza in a Lake
Growing new body parts, reversing paralysis, stretching the limits of the human life span: This trailblazing stem cell researcher believes it is all within our reach.

Discover Magazine

Biocentrism / Robert Lanza’s Theory of Everything
Biocentrism Book Cover
BIOCENTRISM

How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe

“Like “A Brief History of Time” it is indeed stimulating and brings biology into the whole. Any short statement does not do justice to such a scholarly work. Almost every society of mankind has explained the mystery of our surroundings and being by invoking a god or group of gods. Scientists work to acquire objective answers from the infinity of space or the inner machinery of the atom. Lanza proposes a biocentrist theory which ascribes the answer to the observer rather than the observed. The work is a scholarly consideration of science and philosophy that brings biology into the central role in unifying the whole. The book will appeal to an audience of many different disciplines because it is a new way of looking at the old problem of our existence. Most importantly, it makes you think.”
– Nobel Prize Winner E. Donnall Thomas

Coming Soon
Beyond Biocentrism Book Cover Graphic
BEYOND BIOCENTRISM
Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death

Biocentrism shocked the world with a radical rethinking of the nature of reality … but that was just the beginning.

The Biocentric Universe Theory: Life Creates Time, Space, and the Cosmos Itself
Photo of Space
The Biocentric Universe Theory: Stem-cell guru Robert Lanza presents a radical new view of the universe and everything in it.

Discover Magazine

Lanza’s Research Featured on the Cover of U.S. News & World Report
Cover of U.S. News and World Report
Lanza’s team cloned the first human embryo. How American scientists made history by creating lifesaving embryos cells.

U.S. News & World Report

Lanza’s Team Clones First Endangered Species
Photo of Giant Pandas
Endangered Species Cloned

Newsweek

Lanza Receives “Rave Award” for Medicine
Winner Wired Magazine's Rave Award
Robert Lanza Receives Award for Eye-Opening Work on Embryonic Stem Cells

Wired Magazine

Robert Lanza Featured in People Magazine
Robert Lanza on People Magazine
Send in the Clones. Biologist Robert Lanza has a plan to help endangered species fight extinction.

People Magazine

Lanza’s Research Featured on Front Page of New York Times
Photo in Lab Research
Biologists have developed a technique for establishing colonies of human embryonic stem cells from an early human embryo without destroying it.

New York Times

Robert Lanza Featured on Front Page of New York Times
Photo of Dr. Robert Lanza
Stem Cell Test Tried on Mice Saves Embryo. Technique Could Shift Debate on Humans.

New York Times

A New Theory of the Universe
Photo of Green Electric Waves
A New Theory of the Universe: Biocentrism builds on quantum physics by adding life to the equation.

The American Scholar

Featured on the Cover of Wired Magazine
Photo of Dr. Robert Lanza Surrounded by Waterlillies
Seven Days of Creation. The inside story of a human cloning experiment.

Wired Magazine
Wired Magazine Cover Story with Dr. Robert Lanza

U.S. News & World Report Cover Story
“…his mentors described him [Lanza] as a “genius,” a “renegade” thinker, even likening him to Einstein.”

Lanza Featured in Fortune Magazine
“Robert Lanza is the living embodiment of the character played by Matt Damon in the movie Good Will Hunting. Growing up underprivileged in Stoughton, Mass., south of Boston, the young preteen caught the attention of Harvard Medical School researchers when he showed up on the university steps having successfully altered the genetics of chickens in his basement. Over the next decade, he was to be “discovered” and taken under the wing of scientific giants such as psychologist B. F. Skinner, immunologist Jonas Salk, and heart transplant pioneer Christiaan Barnard. His mentors described him as a “genius,” a “renegade” thinker, even likening him to Einstein.”

Research with B. F. Skinner
“The Father of Modern Behavorism”
Photo of B. F. Skinner
Most Prominent Psychologists

(Citations Per Scholar)

Freud318
Skinner140
Piaget107
Rogers100
Pavlov85
Symbolic Communication Between Two Pigeons
Photo of Symbolic Communication Between Two Pigeons
SCIENCE 207; 543 (1980)
Lanza (with Skinner & Epstein)

“Self-Awareness” in the Pigeon
Photo of Self-Awareness In The Pigeon
SCIENCE 212; 695 (1981)
Lanza (with Skinner & Epstein)

“Lying” in the Pigeon
Photo of Lying In The Pigeon
Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior 38; 201 (1982)
Lanza (with Skinner & Starr)

Lanza & Skinner’s Work Featured in TIME Magazine
Photo of the Brain
Pigeon Talk − A triumph for bird brains
TIME Magazine

Lanza & Skinner’s Work on Symbolic Communication Featured in New York Times
Photo of B. F. Skinner
Pigeons’ ‘Conversation’ Triggers a Debate About Language
New York Times

Lanza & Skinner’s Work on Self-Awareness in New York Times
Photo of B. F. Skinner
Science Watch: ‘Self-Awareness’ in Animals
New York Times

Lanza and Skinner’s Work Featured in My Weekly Reader
My Weekly Reader logo
Pigeons Punch Buttons. Talking or Training?
My Weekly Reader

Research with Jonas Salk and Christiaan Barnard
Work with Jonas Salk

Photo of Jonas Salk
Developed Polio Vaccine

J. Supramol. Struct 182;33 (1979)
Lanza (with Salk)

Work with Christiaan Barnard

Photo of Christiaan Barnard
Performed the World’s First Heart Transplant

New England Journal of Medicine 307; 1275 (1983)
Lanza (with Barnard & Cooper)

JAMA 249; 1746 (1983)
Lanza (with Barnard, Cooper & Cassidy)

American Heart Journal 107; 8 (1984)
Lanza (with Barnard, Cooper & Boyd)

Quick Links
Books by Dr. Robert Lanza
Facts about Dr. Robert Lanza
Dr. Robert Lanza - Advanced Cell Technology, Inc
Dr. Robert Lanza on The Huffington Post
Dr. Robert Lanza, Chief Scientific Officer at Advanced Cell Technology
Dr. Robert Lanza on Psychology Today
Biocentrism Site for Robert Lanza, M.D.
Robert Lanza Interview By Deepak Chopra
Robert Lanza Quotes
Robert Lanza, Professor at Wake Forest School of Medicine
biocentricity.net: Exploring the theory of the biocentric universe

Robert Lanza on Huffington Post
The Big Questions
Huffington Post Animated Graphic

Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Why Does Life Exist?

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Why Are You Here? A New Theory May Hold the Missing Piece

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Who Are We? Experiments Suggest You’re Not Who You Think

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Time and Death
Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Does Death Exist? New Theory Says ‘No’

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic What Happens When You Die? Evidence Suggests Time Simply Reboots

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Does the Past Exist Yet? Evidence Suggests Your Past Isn’t Set in Stone

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Is Death the End? Experiments Suggest You Create Time

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Do You Only Live Once? Experiments Suggest Life Not One–Time Deal

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Five Reasons You Won’t Die

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Why You Will Always Exist

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God
Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Judgement Day is Coming. Science Suggests Justice is Inescapable.

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Does the Soul Exist? Evidence Says ‘Yes’

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The Universe
Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Anything Beyond the Universe? New Theory Changes Our Destiny

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Miscellaneous
Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Are We Part of a Single Living Organism?

Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Have Aliens Left The Universe? Theory Predicts We’ll Follow

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Robert Lanza on Huffington Post - Article Thumbnail Graphic Are Dreams An Extension Of Physical Reality?

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Robert Lanza takes the Ice Bucket Challenge

Robert Lanza Article Thumbnail Graphic
"Before I did the #icebucketchallenge, I challenged the leader of Advanced Cell Technology (ACT), Dr. Bob Lanza, to do the Ice Bucket Challenge. He did it and leading up to it he provided a quite articulate message for context (see video). Bob is one very cool guy even without ice water."
Paul Knoepfler

Entire Company takes the Ice Bucket Challenge.
7 years ago
Adam Rangihana
Adam Rangihana
Robert Lanza
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert P. Lanza
Robert Lanza in laboratory.JPG
Lanza at a laboratory in October 2009.
BornRobert Paul Lanza
February 11, 1956 (age 60)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
ResidenceClinton, Massachusetts, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
InstitutionsAstellas Pharma Ocata Therapeutics, Inc. Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Alma materUniversity of Pennsylvania
Known forStem cell biology, cloning,
tissue engineering, biocentric universe
InfluencesJonas Salk, Christiaan Barnard,
and B. F. Skinner
Robert Paul Lanza (born 11 February 1956) is a prominent American medical doctor and scientist. He is currently Head of Astellas Global Regenerative Medicine,[1] and is Chief Scientific Officer of Ocata Therapeutics, formerly named Advanced Cell Technology[2] and Adjunct Professor at the Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Contents [hide]
1Early life and education
2Career
2.1Stem cell research
2.2Clinical trials for blindness
2.3First published reports of embryonic stem cells in humans
2.4Biocentrism
3Awards and public commentary
4Publications
4.1Books
5References
6External links
Early life and education[edit]
Lanza was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and grew up south of there, in Stoughton, Massachusetts. Lanza "altered the genetics of chickens in his basement", and came to the attention of Harvard Medical School researchers when he appeared at the university with his results. Jonas Salk, B. F. Skinner, and Christiaan Barnard mentored Lanza over the next ten years.[3] Lanza attended the University of Pennsylvania, receiving BA and MD degrees. There, he was a Benjamin Franklin Scholar and a University Scholar. Lanza was a Fulbright Scholar. He currently resides in Clinton, Massachusetts.

Career[edit]

Lanza being interviewed by Barbara Walters in 2007.
Stem cell research[edit]
Lanza was part of the team that cloned the world's first early stage human embryos,[4][5] as well as the first to successfully generate stem cells from adults using somatic-cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning).[6][7]

Lanza demonstrated that techniques used in preimplantation genetic diagnosis could be used to generate embryonic stem cells without embryonic destruction.[8]

In 2001, he was also the first to clone an endangered species (a Gaur),[9] and in 2003, he cloned an endangered wild ox (a Banteng)[10] from the frozen skin cells of an animal that had died at the San Diego Zoo nearly a quarter-of-a-century earlier.

Lanza and his colleagues were the first to demonstrate that nuclear transplantation could be used to reverse the aging process[11] and to generate immune-compatible tissues, including the first organ grown in the laboratory from cloned cells.[12]

Lanza showed that it is feasible to generate functional oxygen-carrying red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells under conditions suitable for clinical scale-up. The blood cells could potentially serve as a source of “universal” blood.[13][14]

His team discovered how to generate functional hemangioblasts (a population of "ambulance" cells[15]) from human embryonic stem cells. In animals, these cells quickly repaired vascular damage, cutting the death rate after a heart attack in half and restoring the blood flow to ischemic limbs that might otherwise have required amputation.[16]

Recently, Lanza and a team led by Kwang-Soo Kim at Harvard University reported a safe method for generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.[17] Human iPS cells were created from skin cells by direct delivery of proteins, thus eliminating the harmful risks associated with genetic and chemical manipulation. This new method provides a potentially safe source of patient-specific stem cells for translation into the clinic.[18] Lanza and Advanced Cell Technology expect to start the process for regulatory approval of what experts said would be the first human trial involving induced plutipotent (iPS) stem cells created by reprogramming adult cells back to an embryonic-like state. They want to test blood-clotting particles, called platelets, made from such reprogrammed cells. Platelets don't carry the risk of genetic defects because they don't have DNA.[19]

Clinical trials for blindness[edit]
Lanza’s team at Advanced Cell Technology has succeeded in getting stem cells to grow into retinal cells.[20] With this technology, some forms of blindness may be curable,[21] including macular degeneration and Stargardt disease, currently untreatable eye diseases that cause blindness in teenagers, young adults, and the elderly.

Advanced Cell Technology has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for human trials using human embryonic stem cells to treat degenerative eye diseases.[22][23] This treatment for eye disease uses stem cells to re-create a type of cell in the retina that supports the photoreceptor cells needed for vision. These cells, called retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), are often the first to die off in age-related macular degeneration and other eye diseases, which in turn leads to loss of vision. Several years ago, Lanza’s team found that human embryonic stem cells could be a source of RPE cells, and subsequent studies found that these cells could restore vision in animal models of macular degeneration.[24]

In recent studies, the same team of researchers showed that their stem-cell therapy provides a long-term benefit in animal models of vision loss.[25] The retinal cells achieved near normal function in animals that otherwise would have gone blind.

In September 2011, Lanza’s company received approval from the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency to begin the first human embryonic stem cell trial in Europe.[26][27] Surgeons at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London will inject healthy retinal cells into the eyes of patients with Stargardt's macular dystrophy, hoping to slow, halt or even reverse the effects of the disease. The first person received the embryonic stem cell treatment earlier this year (2012). The patient reports improved vision in the eye treated with the cells, which The Guardian said “represents a huge scientific achievement.”[28]

First published reports of embryonic stem cells in humans[edit]
Dr. Lanza and his colleagues at UCLA’s Jules Stein Eye Institute published the first-ever report of the medical use of human embryonic stem cells transplanted into human patients.[29] The researchers initiated two prospective clinical studies to establish the safety and tolerability of subretinal transplantation of hESC-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in patients with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy and dry age-related macular degeneration.

After surgery, evidence confirmed cells had attached and continued to persist during the study. The researchers did not identify any signs of hyperproliferation, tumorigenicity, or ectopic tissue formation in either patient.

The patients who received the human embryonic stem cell transplants say their lives have been transformed by the experimental procedure.[30] During the 4-month observation period neither patient lost vision. Best corrected visual acuity improved from hand motions to 20/800 (and improved from 0 to 5 letters on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] visual acuity chart) in the study eye of the patient with Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, and vision also seemed to improve in the patient with dry age-related macular degeneration.[29] One of the patients no longer needs a large magnifying glass to read and can reportedly thread a needle, and the other has begun to go shopping on her own.[31] The future therapeutic goal of these studies will be to treat patients earlier in the disease processes, potentially increasing the likelihood of visual rescue.[29]

In October 2014, Dr. Lanza and his colleagues published a follow-up paper in the journal The Lancet, providing the first evidence of the long-term safety and possible biologic activity of pluripotent stem cell progeny into humans with any disease.[32] "For a nice two decades scientists have dreamt about using human embryonic stem cells to treat diseases,” said Gautam Naik, Science Reporter at The Wall Street Journal “that day has finally come…scientists have used human embryonic stem cells to successfully treat patients suffering from severe vision loss." [33] RPE cells derived from embryonic stem cells were injected into the eyes of 18 patients with either Stargardt’s disease or dry-AMD. The patients were followed for more than three years, and half of them were able to read three more lines on the eye chart, which translated to critical improvements in their daily lives as well.[34]

Biocentrism[edit]
Main article: Biocentric universe
In 2007, Lanza's article titled "A New Theory of the Universe" appeared in The American Scholar.[35] The essay addressed Lanza's idea of biocentric universe, which places biology above the other sciences.[36][37][38] Lanza's book Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the Universe followed in 2009, co-written with Bob Berman.[39] Reception for Lanza's hypothesis has been mixed.[40]

Awards and public commentary[edit]
Lanza has received numerous awards and other recognition, including TIME Magazine’s 2014 Time 100 list of the "100 Most Influential People in the World",[41] the 2013 “Il Leone di San Marco Award in Medicine” (Italian Heritage and Culture Committee, along with Regis Philbin, who received the award in Entertainment),[42] a 2010 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Award for “Translating Basic Science Discoveries into New and Better Treatments”;[43] a 2010 “Movers and Shakers” Who Will Shape Biotech Over the Next 20 Years (BioWorld, along with Craig Venter and President Barack Obama);[44] a 2005 Wired magazine "Rave Award" for medicine “For eye-opening work on embryonic stem cells”,[45] and a 2006 Mass High Tech journal “All Star” award for biotechnology for “pushing stem cells’ future”.[46][47]

Publications[edit]
Lanza has authored and co-edited books on topics involving tissue engineering, cloning, stem cells, Regenerative Medicine, and world health.

Books[edit]
1984 Heart Transplantation: The Present Status of Orthotopic and Heterotopic Heart Transplantation ISBN 0-85200-862-7
1985 Medical Science and the Advancement of World Health ISBN 0-03-071734-5
1994 Pancreatic Islet Transplantation: Volume I Procurement of Pancreatic Islets ISBN 1-57059-133-4
1994 Pancreatic Islet Transplantation: Volume II Immunomodulation of Pancreatic Islets ISBN 1-57059-134-2
1994 Pancreatic Islet Transplantation: Volume III Immunoisolation of Pancreatic Islets ISBN 1-57059-135-0
1996 One World: The Health and Survival of the Human Species in the 21st Century ISBN 0-929173-33-3
1996 Yearbook of Cell and Tissue Transplantation ISBN 0-7923-3844-8
1997 Principles of Tissue Engineering ISBN 1-57059-342-6
1999 Cell Encapsulation Technology and Therapeutics ISBN 0-8176-4010-X
2000 Xeno: The Promise of Transplanting Animal Organs into Humans ISBN 0-19-512833-8
2000 Principles of Tissue Engineering, Second Edition ISBN 0-12-436630-9
2002 Methods of Tissue Engineering ISBN 0-12-436636-8
2002 Principles of Cloning ISBN 0-12-174597-X
2004 Handbook of Stem Cells: Volume 1 Embryonic Stem Cells ISBN 0-12-436642-2
2004 Handbook of Stem Cells: Volume 2 Adult and Fetal Stem Cells ISBN 0-12-436644-9
2006 Essentials of Stem Cell Biology ISBN 0-12-088442-9
2006 Methods in Enzymology: Volume 418 Embryonic Stem Cells ISBN 0-12-373648-X
2006 Methods in Enzymology: Volume 419 Adult Stem Cells ISBN 0-12-373650-1
2006 Methods in Enzymology: Volume 420 Stem Cell Tools and Other Experimental Protocols ISBN 0-12-373651-X
2007 Principles of Tissue Engineering, Third Edition ISBN 0-12-370615-7
2008 Principles of Regenerative Medicine ISBN 978-0-12-369410-2
2009 Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the Universe ISBN 978-1-933771-69-4
2009 Essential Stem Cell Methods ISBN 978-0-12-374741-9
2009 Essentials of Stem Cell Biology, Second Edition ISBN 978-0-12-374729-7
2009 Foundations of Regenerative Medicine ISBN 978-0-12-375085-3
2010 Principles of Regenerative Medicine, Second Edition ISBN 978-0-12-381422-7
2012 Handbook of Stem Cells: Volume 1 Embryonic Stem Cells, Second Edition ISBN 0-12-385942-5
2012 Handbook of Stem Cells: Volume 2 Adult and Fetal Stem Cells, Second Edition ISBN 978-0-12-385942-6
2013 Principles of Cloning, Second Edition ISBN 978-0-12-386541-0
2013 Principles of Tissue Engineering, Fourth Edition ISBN 978-0-12-398358-9
2013 Essentials of Stem Cell Biology, Third Edition ISBN 978-0-12-409503-8
References[edit]
Jump up ^ "Ocata’s chief scientific officer to join new parent after acquisition". Boston Globe. Retrieved February 24, 2016.
Jump up ^ "Ocata Therapeutics Management". Ocata Therapeutics. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
Jump up ^ Fischer, Joannie (2001-11-25). "The First Clone". U.S. News & World Report: 1–9. Retrieved 2008-08-20.
Jump up ^ Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol (2001-11-24). "The First Human Cloned Embryo". Scientific American: 1–4. Retrieved 2008-08-20.
Jump up ^ "Wired 12.01: Seven Days of Creation". Wired.com. 2009-01-04. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ Cell Stem Cell. "Access : Human somatic cell nuclear transfer using adult cells". Cell Press. Retrieved 2014-04-18.
Jump up ^ Naik, Gautam (2014-04-17). "Scientists Make First Embryo Clones From Adults". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2014-04-18.
Jump up ^ Nature. "Access : Human embryonic stem cell lines derived from single blastomeres". Nature. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Cloning Noah's Ark: Scientific American". Sciam.com. 2000-11-19. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Wild Cows Cloned". NPR. 2003-04-08. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ Robert P. Lanza, Jose B. Cibelli, Catherine Blackwell, Vincent J. Cristofalo, Mary Kay Francis, Gabriela M. Baerlocher, Jennifer Mak, Michael Schertzer, Elizabeth A. Chavez, Nancy Sawyer, Peter M. Lansdorp, Michael D. West1 (28 April 2000). "Extension of Cell Life-Span and Telomere Length in Animals Cloned from Senescent Somatic Cells" (PDF). Science.
Jump up ^ "Generation of histocompatible tissues using nuclear transplantation - Nature Biotechnology". Nature.com. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Blood - Biological properties and enucleation of red blood cells from human embryoni". Bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org. doi:10.1182/blood-2008-05-157198. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ [1] Archived November 20, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
Jump up ^ Vergano, Dan (2007-05-08). "Elusive 'ambulance' cells are created - USATODAY.com". Usatoday.ComJump up ^ "Generation of functional hemangioblasts from human embryonic stem cells - Nature Methods". Nature.com. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Cell Stem Cell - Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Direct Delivery of Reprogramming Proteins". Cell.com. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ Park, Alice (2009-05-28). "Researchers Hail Stem Cells Safe for Human Use". TIME. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ ROCKOFF, JONATHAN (2012-12-13). "Stem-Cell Trial Without Embryo Destruction". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2013-01-14.
Jump up ^ "Stem Cells May Open Some Eyes". Wired.com. 2004-09-24. Archived from the original on August 15, 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ "Microsoft Word - stem cell aid may soon treat some blindness.doc" (PDF). Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ "FDA Approves Second Trial of Stem-Cell Therapy". TIME. 2010-11-22. Retrieved 2010-12-07.
Jump up ^ "Second human embryonic stem cell clinical trial to start". USA Today. 2010-11-22. Retrieved 2010-12-07.
Jump up ^ "Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Cells Rescue Visual Function in Dystrophic RCS Rats – Cloning Stem Cells". Liebertonline.com. 2006-09-29. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ "Long-term Safety and Function of RPE from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Preclinical Models of Macular Degeneration – Stem Cells". Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. 2009-07-01. Retrieved 2009-08-30.
Jump up ^ Sample, Ian (2011-09-22). "First trial of embryonic stem cell treatment in Europe gets green light". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2011-09-22.
Jump up ^ "First European Embryonic Stem Cell Trial Gets Green Light". TIME. 2011-09-22. Retrieved 2011-09-22.
Jump up ^ Boseley, Sarah (2012-06-04). "Stem cell scientists take hope from first human trials but see long road ahead". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2012-06-11.
^ Jump up to: a b c "Embryonic stem cell trials for macular degeneration: a preliminary report". The Lancet. 2012-02-25. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
Jump up ^ "Early Success in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Trial to Treat Blindness". TIME.com. 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
Jump up ^ Stein, Rob (2012-01-23). "Embryonic stem cells appear to restore some vision to legally blind patient". Washington Post. Retrieved 2012-03-15.
Jump up ^ "Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium in patients with age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt's macular dystrophy". Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. 2014-10-15. Retrieved 2014-12-18.
Jump up ^ "Treating Eye Diseases With Stem Cells". wsj.com. 2014-10-14. Retrieved 2014-12-18.
Jump up ^ Park, Alice (2014-10-14). "Stem Cells Allow Nearly Blind Patients to See". time.com. Retrieved 2014-12-18.
Jump up ^ "A New Theory of the Universe:Biocentrism builds on quantum physics by putting life into the equation" (Spring). The American Scholar. 2007.
Jump up ^ Aaron Rowe (2009-01-04). "Will Biology Solve the Universe?". Wired.com. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Theory of every-living-thing - Cosmic Log - msnbc.com". Cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Robert Lanza - Tag Story Index - USATODAY.com". Asp.usatoday.com. 2008-10-16. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ Lanza, Robert; Berman, Bob (April 14, 2009). Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe. BenBella Books. ISBN 978-1-933771-69-4.
Jump up ^ "The Universe in Your Head". MSNBC. 2009-06-16. Retrieved 2010-03-31.
Jump up ^ "TIME: The 100 Most Influential People - Robert Lanza". TIME.com. 2014-04-24. Retrieved 2015-03-17.
Jump up ^ "ACT's Dr. Robert Lanza to Receive the Il Leone di San Marco Award in Medicine". nla.gov. 2013-09-24. Retrieved 2015-10-31.
Jump up ^ "Stem cell leaders Lanza, Kim win $1.9M NIH award". MassHighTech.com. 2010-09-22. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
Jump up ^ "Advanced Cell Technology’s Chief Scientific Officer Dr. Robert Lanza Honored By BioWorld Magazine As Leader Who Could Shape Biotech Over Next 20 Years". Bloomberg.com. 2010-05-10. Retrieved 2015-10-31.
Jump up ^ "Wired 13.03: The 2005 Wired Rave Awards". Wired.com. 2009-01-04. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ "Dr. Robert Lanza Receives 2006 'All Star' Award for Biotechnology. Industry & Business Article - Research, News, Information, Contacts, Divisions, Subsidiaries, Business Associations". Goliath.ecnext.com. 2006-10-24. Retrieved 2009-08-09.
Jump up ^ Songini, Marc (August 14, 2009). "Thought Leaders:Robert Lanza on stem cells and access to health care". Mass High Tech. Retrieved 4 March 2010. He was named a Mass High Tech All Star in 2006
External links[edit]
Personal website: blog, and archive of books, articles and news.
Advanced Cell Technology website
Robert Lanza – Biocentrism blog and archive of Lanza's biocentrism theory
Lanza's essays on The Huffington Post
Biocentrism / Robert Lanza's theory of everything
Authority control
WorldCat Identities VIAF: 84864906 ISNI: 0000 0001 0995 030X SUDOC: 052647617 BNF: cb13598272n (data)
Categories: 1956 birthsWake Forest University facultyUniversity of Pennsylvania alumniLiving peopleFulbright ScholarsAmerican science writersStem cell researchersLife sciences industry
7 years ago